Galerie

laurentbelkacem:

Des livres mis sur le trottoir. J’aime bien le Ellison. J’ai de très vagues souvenirs de Kampus, c’est dire si je suis un vieux con.

Galerie

“You’re not the both of me!” said the schizoid man

Galerie

Going on with my Christmas gift, this set from A., a very useful and sexy nipponese MCUSTA and a science-fiction book which is on top of my book pile (and I would have probably have finished when this post appears here).

Galerie

laurentbelkacem:

Bibliothèque d’avant Kindle.

I solved the hardware problem, still fiddling with software.

Galerie

alte-hase:

laurentbelkacem:

laurentbelkacem:

Minimal technical library.

Of course, four-yearish later, it’s obsolete. I’ve got almost everything I need on my ereader or my tablet. I think that there are about 40-50 books still not digitized that I need, a problem that will be solved in 2017 at the latest.

*****

I’m rebloging this because I have to admit I’m lacking material to post – I probably won’t have anything new to take picture of, apart from clouds, guns, snow and mountains (and it quickly gets old), for at least a week, and I’m still working on text posts (mostly about music, cinema, books and cars). I see that as a retrospectival interlude.

*makes grabby hands at that copy of Eumeswil*

But it’s in French… Do you want it in English [epub | mobi | pdf | txt] ?

Galerie

laurentbelkacem:

Minimal technical library.

Of course, four-yearish later, it’s obsolete. I’ve got almost everything I need on my ereader or my tablet. I think that there are about 40-50 books still not digitized that I need, a problem that will be solved in 2017 at the latest.

*****

I’m rebloging this because I have to admit I’m lacking material to post – I probably won’t have anything new to take picture of, apart from clouds, guns, snow and mountains (and it quickly gets old), for at least a week, and I’m still working on text posts (mostly about music, cinema, books and cars). I see that as a retrospectival interlude.

Galerie

laurentbelkacem:

Minimal technical library.

Of course, four-yearish later, it’s obsolete. I’ve got almost everything I need on my ereader or my tablet. I think that there are about 40-50 books still not digitized that I need, a problem that will be solved in 2017 at the latest.

*****

I’m rebloging this because I have to admit I’m lacking material to post – I probably won’t have anything new to take picture of, apart from clouds, guns, snow and mountains (and it quickly gets old), for at least a week, and I’m still working on text posts (mostly about music, cinema, books and cars). I see that as a retrospectival interlude.

Galerie

I’m taking the time to read more. This month, I read :

Jurassic Park – CRICHTON Michael

It was rather entertaining. I don’t like the conservative bias of Crichton on science, but the story was nevertheless very interresting. Its little girl character is so awful you can’t help to hope that she will be soon mauled by an horrific predator, either a Velociraptor or a Woody Allen. 4/10

The Yiddish Policemen’s Union – CHABON Michael

A strange book, kind of reminiscent of my favourite detective crime novels. It’s a strange alternative reality roman noir, where the Jews after World War II didn’t go to Palestine but were sent to Alaska. It’s sometimes a little hard to follow, since I lack the whole background of the characters, but the complexity of the story and its whodunnit is a reward in itself. 7/10

Je suis un roman noir – ADG

A writer’s book playing the noir genre card. It’s not really a masterpiece but there’s a reference to Antoine Blondin. If you like the decadent ambiance you could find in France of the seventies, you may find this book entertaining. 4/10

Pour venger Pépère – ADG

Probably ADG’s masterpiece, this novel was even laudated by Jean-Patrick Manchette, his leftist counterpart. It’s part crime, part revenge novel set in the very peaceful Touraine of the seventies. 8/10

Uplift – BRIN David

Part hard-science, part space-opera, the story of the humanity with its uplifted companions (apes and dolphins) against a very rigid and strict galactic civilization. It’s a great novel with a strong story and excellent characters, but I really have trouble with the writing – i.e. all the dialogs of the non-human characters. They have all their particular voices, and it may seems a good idea, but it’s hurting the flow of the reading and it’s quite unnecessary to explain the strangeness of the situation. In fact, I stalled at the fifth volume of the double trilogy (the second trilogy being Exiles), because most of the characters are non-humans, and I didn’t have time for this kind of bullshit. First trilogy 7/10, second one 1/10

La Vérité sur l’Affaire Harry Quebert – DICKER Joël

Another writer’s novel, kind of breteastonellisean. The author comes from Geneva, but it’s a very pseudo-american novel, like a SIMCA Vedette was a pseudo-american car in the fifties. I found it rather bland. 3/10

Lines of departure – KLOOS Marko

The long awaited sequel of Terms of enlistment, this is a great military sci-fi novel. It’s very classical, well written, and is depecting the difficult fight of Earth colonial forces against a very powerful challenger. If you like Scalzi’s Old man’s war, Heinlein’s Starship troopers, Ringo’s Posleen war or Haldeman’s Forever war, you’re bound to love this novel. 10/10

Castigo Cay – BRACKEN Matthew 

A rather dystopian novel, except, oh wait, it’s not set in a paralel universe. All in all, it’s a rather cool little book about nautism, freedom, violence, self-reliance and the coming collapse of civilization as we understand it. 5/10  

299 days – TATE Glen

299 days is a survivalist novel, part speculative-fiction, part didactic opus. In this line of novels, I think Rawles’ Patriots, Forstchen’s One Second after, or Casey’s Teenage survivalist are far superior. Like most preppy litterary works, it can be rather obnoxious with not so subtle political notions or concepts (sheepdogism in particular). The quality of writing isn’t that good ; like most early work of fiction, a great deal of autobiography is filtering through. It’s still rather enjoyable to read. The thing I found the most interresting was the description of the situation of the State of Washington, which is very similar to France’s one 4/10