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Dushka and Ma Deuce in Military Museum of Wrocław.

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MG 34 and MG 42. Did not leave pleasant memories all over Europe, particularly in Poland.

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That time when Dali tried to produce machine guns

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Machine gun (I presume a Maxim wz. 1910/28, since it was the model used by Second Polish Republic’s Army).

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CZ ZB53 mod. 1937

The ZB-53 was designed by Václav Holek and Miroslav Rolčík of the Zbrojovka Brno works as a replacement for the Schwarzlose machine gun of World War I origin. Based on the earlier vz. 35 machine gun, the prototype was tested in 1936 and the following year the new machine gun was adopted by the Czechoslovak Army with the designation TK vz. 37 (“Heavy Machine Gun Mark 1937”).[1] It was introduced as the standard machine gun of Czechoslovak LT-35 and LT-38 tanks. Czechoslovakia exported the gun to Romania, Yugoslavia, Argentina, Afghanistan, Iran and China (roughly 850 pieces used during the Second Sino-Japanese War), while UK bought a license and started to produce its own version, known as the BESA (over 60,000 pieces made).

The weapon was a gas-operated, belt-fed, air-cooled machine gun that served both the infantry support and vehicle weapons roles. The machine gun was delivered in three variants: infantry machine gun (on heavy tripod), heavy bunker machine gun (with heavier barrel, marked “O”) and for armoured vehicles (marked “ÚV”). It was designed to withstand five minutes of constant fire, after which time the barrel had to be changed due to wear. Although modern, the weapon was prone to jamming due to complicated rate of fire selection mechanism.

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laurentbelkacem:

Ideal for shopping and urban cruising.

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Machine gun and antitank rifle from WW1 museum in Ypres. Great museum, a must see about this war.