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On front you’ll find the not so common disposable RPG 76 “Komar” (”mosquito”) a compact anti-tank grenade launcher with a folding stock and the ability to be shot in confined spaces unlike most rocket launchers and recoilless rifles. It seems it was mostly used as an anti-personal/anti-truck weapon by Polish forces in Afghanistan and Irak, since fast evolution of armor made the grenade obsolete for anti-tank role.

And on this interesting weapon, I’m closing both the visit of Wrocław and its Military Museum. 

Now our traditional program of banal cars, street art, sculptures and architecture will resume. 

Nevertheless, if you discovered this blog thanks to the generous reblogs of massively excellent @cerebralzero, @lee-enfeel, @jeep42willys@bluefouralpha (and all the others I don’t know that much – thanks a lot too !), you’re probably here for the guns. In this case, while waiting for the next guns posts, you may want to explore my [guns] and [military museums] tags.

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Dushka and Ma Deuce in Military Museum of Wrocław.

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PTRD 41 (and what looks like a PTRS 41 on its left) anti-tank rifles and KPV heavy machine-gun, both 14.5×114 mm Soviet weapons. 

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MG 34 and MG 42. Did not leave pleasant memories all over Europe, particularly in Poland.

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Neither cover nor concealment, obviously. 

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That time when Dali tried to produce machine guns

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I presume this is Soviet counterpart to Col. Cooper First Rule of Gun Safety – all guns are always loaded.

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Three generations of Soviet suppressive fire. Degtyaryov machine gun and Degtyaryov tank machine gun (DPM), RPD, and PK.

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Various police and military sidearms of the XXth Century. Military Museum of Wrocław.

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When you see this light machine gun, the correct reflex is to go full zombie and to scream “BREN ! BREEEEENNNNN !