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A nest of yellow Cinquecento.

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ZSD Nysa 522, cousin of the Źuk.

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FIAT 126p in Kraków

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Polski FIAT

The car was produced in Poland under the brand Polski Fiat 126p (literally in English: Polish Fiat 126p) between 1973 and 2000. At first it was almost identical with the basic model: differences included a higher chassis, a modified grille on the back, and the front blinkers that were white in Italy but orange for other markets. To distinguish it from the original Italian car, the letter “p” was added to its name. It was produced by Fabryka Samochodów Małolitrażowych (FSM) in Bielsko-Biała and Tychy under Italian Fiatlicence. Throughout the 1980s the 126p was continuously modified. First it received upgraded brakes and new wheels from Italian Fiat, hazard blinkers were added to meet new law requirements, in 1985 tail fog light and factory back-up light were added to then standard plastic bumpers, an electronic ignition system and alternator replaced undersized generator around 1987. The factory battery in 126p had only 35 Amp-hour capacity which combined with undersized generator resulted in never fully charged battery unless someone drove the car without stopping for extended time period. Some owners upgraded to a 45 Amp-hour battery from Fiat 125p (1.5 Liter engine) to improve the cold start reliability. Due to a relatively low price it was very popular in Poland and was arguably the most popular car there in the 1980s. Its very small size gave it the nickname maluch (“the small one”,“small child”, pronounced [ˈmalux]). The nickname became so popular that in 1997 it was accepted by the producer as the official name of the car.

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It is also a popular platform for electric engine and motorcycle engine swaps .

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FIAT 126p, Cinquecento and Seicento in Wrocław. I had a burgundy Seicento, very similar to the one in the last picture, for several years. I really liked this car.

In EuroNCAP crash tests, the Fiat Seicento was only awarded a 1.5 star rating, and fractionally beat the worst contenders in the history of EuroNCAP, namely the Rover 100 (a restyled Rover Metro, in turn directly based on the Austin Metro) and the original Chrysler Voyager MPV. This is not so surprising, as the car has an extremely short front-end and keeps many components from its predecessor, originally conceived in 1991.

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Żuk machine.

The Żuk (pl. beetle) was a van and light truck produced in Lublin, Poland, between 1958 and 1998 by FSC. It was based on FSO Warszawa which in turn was a copy of a Soviet passenger car GAZ-M20 Pobeda. The chassis, suspension and engine from FSO Warszawa formed the basis of the Żuk and the Nysa light vans designed in the late 1950s. Some 587,000 were made.

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I’m not saying FIAT 126 was designed for Dwarfs of Wrocław.

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Just put a candle inside, and you have your own rolling jack o’lantern.