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Le premier bonheur du jour is a warm gun.

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G43 and a PSO-less Dragunov

The Dragunov is an original rifle design for several reasons. First, it
was not meant for highly trained and specialized sniper teams, but
rather for designated marksmen. After the introduction of the SVD, the Soviet Army deployed designated marksmen at the basic motorized infantry rifle platoon level.[16] Those designated marksmen were often chosen from personnel who did well in terms of rifle marksmanship while members of DOSAAF.
Such marksmen were estimated to have a 50% probability of hitting a
standing, man-sized target at 800 m (875 yd), and an 80% probability of
hitting a standing, man-sized target at 500 m (547 yd). For distances
not exceeding 200 m (219 yd) the probability was estimated to be well
above 90%. To attain this level of accuracy the sniper could not engage
more than two such targets per minute.[17] Later in every platoon of Warsaw Pact troops, there was at least one Dragunov rifle marksman. In the German Democratic Republic arsenals alone, there were almost 2,000 Dragunov rifles,[18] while in many Western armies there was not even a single sniper rifle except in special forces units (as an example, in the Italian Army
until the 1990s), but in Warsaw Pact troop formations, the Dragunov
marksmen were widespread among the regular units. To fulfill this role,
the rifle is relatively light for a sniper rifle, but well balanced,
making it easier to use in a dynamic battle. It is also a semi-automatic
rifle, a rare feature for accuracy-oriented rifles in the 1960s (except
for customized ordnance, like M1 Garands),
to allow rapid fire and quicker engagement of multiple targets. As with
all precision-oriented rifles, the user has to take care not to
overheat the barrel and limit the use of rapid fire. In order to fire
effective API ammunition, its accuracy potential was slightly downgraded
by shortening the twist rate, another uncommon priority for a pure
sniper rifle. It has a relatively light barrel profile; its precision is
good, but not exceptional. Like an assault rifle, the rifle has mounts
on the barrel to fix a bayonet. The standard AKM bayonet can even be
used to cut electrified barbed wire. Lastly, the rifle was meant to be a
relatively cheap mass-produced firearm.

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Chinese semi-auto AK in 5.56×45, with Kastinger universal sling.

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Swiss machtlock hackbut (Hans Horwer from Luzern, circa 1600-1620)

Swiss matchlock carbine, percussion system (unknown maker, circa 1800)

Hunting carbine, percussion system, Jean Siber from Lausanne made (circa 1800)

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MAS 36 C.R.39 (I presume C.R. is for Crosse repliable, “Folding Stock”), a shortened MAS 36 that didn’t make it in time to participate to WW2 but saw some use in the hands of French Batallion of UNO in Korea and in colonial wars of Indochina and Algeria. Because of the lack of alternative, it was reissued as a survival carbine for French jet fighters pilots during the First Gulf War in 1990.

This rifle got some very clever design imputs, but one of the drawback of using a full-size battle rifle ammunition in a short barrel and a rather light firearms was the recoil’s sharpness (especially for short-frame indigenous troops in Indochina). 

It was often discarded for US M1 Carbine especially in cold climate (the contact of the aluminium stock on the skin being less than nice), and it was replaced as a paratroopers compact gun by MAT 49 SMG.

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MAS 36 from its good side.

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Si l’Anglais est déjà dans la place, je ne m’étonne plus de rien !

Kropatchek 1878 carbine, not to be confused with French Navy 1878 rifle, built on the same action, a seldom seen little rifle, made by Verndl in Steyr (Austria) with a Chassepot-like bolt.

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Si l’Anglais est déjà dans la place, je ne m’étonne plus de rien !

Kropatchek 1878 carbine, not to be confused with French Navy 1878 rifle, built on the same action, a seldom seen little rifle, made by Verndl in Steyr (Austria) with a Chassepot-like bolt.