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laurentbelkacem:

A loaded Browning is the beginning of wisdom. Via @pierre_lemieux

That pistol looks vaguely like a Walther/Manurhin PP Sport, if you think about it…

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shmurnoff hat auf dein Foto geantwortet:

Most of my guns – a day with @shmurnoff

On va remettre ça cet été !

Volontiers !

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Most of my guns – a day with @shmurnoff

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jungerian-tangent:

laurentbelkacem:

Walther PP (.32 ACP), made in 1982 in Ulm. Holster by APAS. I’ve tried it in a practical/dynamic training, and it was not that bad (maybe 70% of what I could expect with a service pistol like my SIG P220). The good points are the pistol is very flat, the handling is good, and the lack of recoil and of barrel jump make double taps quite easy. Given that it was the third time I’ve shot with it, I wasn’t either that satisfied of myself. I’ve identified some problems that weren’t that apparent in static shooting or dry manipulations :

– the trigger, even if enhanced since I fist tried it, is still very hard to master, with a very heavy double action switching to a very soft and light single action. 

– I was not bitten by the hammer nor the slide, but after shooting 70-80 times, the frame tenderized the part of my hand between my thumb and my index. It is still quite red and sensitive today. It’s not very important, but one the thing I quite liked about the PP was its thinness and handling qualities. I was wrong, but my hands are quite big.

– the sights are great for target shooting, but for short distances/chronometred shots, they tend to be a little too small. I didn’t notice it at first, but when I switched to the P220, it became obvious.

– some of my magazines have the slide-hold profile, so I need to push the magazine latch in order to feed them in the magazine well. For a magazine change in a hurry/under stress, they are unusable. The arrangement I figure was to use one of these problematic magazine in the pistol, and use my two other standard magazine as back-up. I don’t see a way to make it up with training. Note that it would not be an issue if the Walther PP were using an European-type magazine latch instead of a browningian one.

– and last but not least, the safety was a huge handicap and I resolved to just ignore it. I don’t like that since I tend to think that with Murphy’s law, it risks to get on at the worst moment possible, but the penalty of using it is about one to two seconds for each unholstering. So I’m just using it for decocking the hammer. 

My conclusion is that even the Walther PP is a nice pistol, have a ton of huge qualities, is pretty, and not at all obselete for a 1929 pistol, I probably will look for a SIG-Sauer P230 or P232 in the same caliber to replace it.

agreed on all points. i fired a PP/K a couple times trying to find a decent carry gun and all i remember is the distinct feeling of getting the web of my hand smashed every time i fired

my experience with it and it’s flaws are actually what led me to finally choose the CZ82 for my EDC – relatively the same dimensions with a stouter chambering, smoother shooting, healthier magazine capacity, modern magazine release and a safety catch that’s easier to ignore than anything else / or allows it to be carried ‘cocked and locked,’ with the only obvious drawback being that it doesn’t also act as a decocker

I haven’t thought of the vz 82 because for some reasons, they are quite expensive in Switzerland and hard to find in .32 ACP, a caliber I favor over .380 ACP. But I was well impressed by the one I tried years ago in 9mm Makarov. I discovered with my CZ 75 (and my P210) that decockers are overrated (the fact they weren’t invented by St. John Browning is the proof they are not that much needed). 

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wynfrith hat auf deine Fotoserie geantwortet:

Walther PP (.32 ACP), made in 1982 in Ulm. Holster…

Can we see the pistol I unholstered? I like pocket pistols, and I want to acquire one more in something better then .25acp, but not larger then 9mm Markov.

Here is it, back with its Nill grips. I took my P220 out of the safe to provide you with a size comparison. Note the PP is really not a pocket pistol, but is a very good choice for an IWB holster carry due to its thinness.

In that category, I’m quite fond of the Beretta 7x and 8x series (and I would very much like to try the tip-up barel 86) and the SIG P23x (I’m looking for a .32 ACP P230 with blue finish at the moment). Makarov pistols are very comfortable too. 

With my meaty hands, anything smaller than a Beretta 7x is problematic, I have troubles reaching the trigger for double taps and I have reliability issues (i.e. with Kel-Tec P32 or Glock 42).

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Walther PP (.32 ACP), made in 1982 in Ulm. Holster by APAS. I’ve tried it in a practical/dynamic training, and it was not that bad (maybe 70% of what I could expect with a service pistol like my SIG P220). The good points are the pistol is very flat, the handling is good, and the lack of recoil and of barrel jump make double taps quite easy. Given that it was the third time I’ve shot with it, I wasn’t either that satisfied with myself. I’ve identified some problems that weren’t that apparent in static shooting or dry manipulations :

– the trigger, even if enhanced since I fist tried it, is still very hard to master, with a very heavy double action switching to a very soft and light single action. 

– I was not bitten by the hammer nor the slide, but after shooting 70-80 times, the frame tenderized the part of my hand between my thumb and my index. It is still quite red and sensitive today. It’s not very important, but one the thing I quite liked about the PP was its thinness and handling qualities. I was wrong, but my hands are quite big.

– the sights are great for target shooting, but for short distances/chronometred shots, they tend to be a little too small. I didn’t notice it at first, but when I switched to the P220, it became obvious.

– some of my magazines have the slide-hold profile, so I need to push the magazine latch in order to feed them in the magazine well. For a magazine change in a hurry/under stress, they are unusable. The arrangement I figure was to use one of these problematic magazines in the pistol, and use my two other standard magazines as back-up. I don’t see a way to make it up with training. Note that it would not be an issue if the Walther PP were using an European-type magazine latch instead of a browningian one.

– and last but not least, the safety was a huge handicap and I resolved to just ignore it. I don’t like that since I tend to think that with Murphy’s law, it risks to get on at the worst moment possible, but the penalty of using it is about one to two seconds for each unholstering. So I’m just using it for decocking the hammer. 

My conclusion is that even the Walther PP is a nice pistol, have a ton of huge qualities, is pretty, and not at all obsolete for a 1929 pistol, I probably will look for a SIG-Sauer P230 or P232 in the same caliber to replace it.

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I’m a bit old school – je suis un peu vieux jeu.

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Je suis tombé par terre

C’est la faute à Walther

I found a new walnut dress for my West German PP.

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Various police and military sidearms of the XXth Century. Military Museum of Wrocław.

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Battle rifles of the Eastern Front – SVT 40, and its German first cousins G41(w) and G43